• R. Rushing

Queen Khenemetneferhedjet

Khenemetneferhedjet. That’s nineteen letters. We'd better take it in slowly.


Khe-ne-met-ne-fer-hed-jet.


Got it?


What a name! It’s long, it's royal, it's exotic, and it’s the name of an Egyptian Twelfth Dynasty queen.


How I saw the queen in my mind's eye.

I love it!


But I'll let you off the hook and give the royal lady's shortened name. Weret.


The name, Khenemetneferhedjet, also serves as a title, meaning 'united with the white crown'. Her shorter name, Weret, means 'the elder'.


Perhaps the lady was greatly beloved, because the wife of her son who became king, was given the name Khenemetneferhedjet-Weret II.


Again, her name was a title. The biblical names Potiphar and Potipherah found in the book of Genesis of the Bible are now suspected to be name-titles, as well.


Weret-I was also titled 'The God’s Wife' because of her chief position above the king's other wives and concubines. She was the daughter of King Amenemhat II, and sister-wife to King Sekhamaat Khakheperre Senuseret II [Senusret, Senwosret, Sesostris are varieties of this name]


Khakheperre Senuseret was an Egyptian Twelfth Dynasty king who was rarely mentioned, never garnering such fame as his father and son. It is under his reign that I placed Seal Of The Sand Dweller, the story of Joseph’s rise to power in Ancient Egypt.


In Seal Of The Sand Dweller, Queen Weret represents the spitefulness that settles on those at the pinnacle of wealth. Though she plays a minor role in the story, I love the texture she brings to the epic.


Give up trying to pronounce Khenemetneferhedjet? Scroll down the Seal Of The Sand Dweller page at www.rrushing.com and select ‘Cast of Characters’ or click on this link to hear all the story names pronounced. Free audio-chapters available here!


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